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Multiply the Joy of Giving AND Receiving

You were on a business trip and found the perfect present for your nephew.  You buy it for him, wrap it and bring it over.  It’s not Christmas or his birthday.  When you arrive, he sees the box in your hand and you see his smile.  You let the anticipation build for a few minutes while you greet your sister.  Your nephew is bouncing, excited to see what’s in the box.  When you finally give it to him, he rips open the paper and as he sees the cool dump truck, his smile widens into a full-on grin.  He jumps up and throws his arms around you, thanking you over and over.  Then the two of you move piles of stuffed animals from one side of his room to another with his cool new truck.  The animated play and his focused excitement fill both of you with joy.

This is the magic of gift-giving.  Surprise.  Excitement.  Gratitude. A shared experience.  A true gift.  This kind of gift exchange locks in wonderful memories that can last a lifetime.

Unfortunately, during the holidays, we’ve turned this idea on its head.  Instead of giving from the heart out of love or appreciation, we give because we’re expected to – out of obligation and some warped sense of barter and reciprocity.  We make our holiday gift list by those we ‘have’ to get a present for.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.  Here are some ideas for recapturing the happiness in gift-giving (and receiving)!

The Joy of Giving

Focus on the people who you want to give a gift to.  Start with a blank piece of paper and think about who you want to show your love to.  Who is going through a hard time and could use a little pick me up?  Who are the people that are always there for you?  Who did something meaningful for you this year and you want to show your appreciation?  These are the people to put on your holiday gift list.

Find meaning within obligation.  If you feel you must give someone a gift this year, find some meaning in that relationship.   What does this person mean to you?  What gratitude can you bring up for them?   Let go of “I need to give them a present [sigh]” and replace it with, “I want to show them my appreciation for being in my life,” or “This will really make a difference to them.”  This simple change of perspective can bring so much more happiness to both of you.

Remember the meaning as you shop/make the present.  Reminding yourself of the appreciation and love you feel for the recipient of the gift can multiply the positive emotions you feel.  Tap into those emotions as you shop for or make their present.  These positive emotions may give you that extra dose of patience you need to find a parking spot at the mall or give you that motivation to mix that final batch of cookies.  Putting together presents in this way can take the chore out of the effort and make it fun.

Give in-person.  When you go through the trouble of buying or making a gift for someone, be there to give it to them.  Imbue the gift with all the love it has by telling them what they mean to you or by sharing stories of how they have been helpful or what you see in them.  Even if you are uncomfortable, soak in the joy and appreciation that your words and the gift provide.  Your thoughtfulness created those positive emotions.  Let yourself feel them!

The Joy of Receiving

Find the meaning.  See the gift, whatever it is, as a little packet of love.  Even if they don’t use the words, find the meaning that the gift represents. This person went through the trouble of acquiring this gift and bringing it specifically to you because of who you are and of what you mean to them.  Let yourself open up to that meaning when you receive the gift.

Let go of reciprocity.  Gifts are meant to make us feel good.  If we get a gift and respond with apology (“Oh, I didn’t get you anything”) or obligation (Now I need to buy them a gift) we drain all the good feelings out of the interaction.  Instead of being energized by your appreciation, they feel bad that their gift made you feel guilty.  Yuck!  What a wasted opportunity.  Let go of obligation and be gracious in your thanks.  They got you something because they wanted to not to get something in return.

Receive generously.  Receiving a gift well – with gratitude and excitement and appreciation – is one of the greatest gifts you can give someone.

Let me say that again…  receiving a gift well is an incredible gift to the giver.  Be that nephew in the story above.  It’s not the object that you are appreciating, but the effort and thought that went into putting you on their list and spending their precious time and/or money finding or making a gift for YOU.  When you light up and share honest appreciation for that effort you multiply the positive feelings for that single generous act.

If you liked the Crap or Cone talk from John Styn I shared a few weeks ago, watch the part of his TED talk on gifting.  (Watch for about a minute from this link.)

The holidays are filled with opportunities for thoughtful giving and gracious receiving.  Take advantage of these endless sources of happiness!

Eric Karpinski
The Happiness Coach

 

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Put More Happy in Your Holidays

Remember when holidays were the happiest time of the year?  When all you had to do was write (and re-write!) your Christmas list or wonder what treat the fourth night of Hanukkah would bring?  Maybe you lay under the Christmas tree and looked up at the lights or got to stay up late to ring in the New Year.

For many of us, all that original holiday joy has been buried under a giant list of “shoulds” and “have tos”:  I have to cook amazing holiday meals, I need to have the perfect Martha Stewart Christmas Tree, I have to send a witty and individualized holiday letter, I should deliver holiday cookies to everyone I know and I need to find a perfect gift for 20+ people.  (All while continuing to take care of the work and family obligations we have every other month of the year, by the way). 

We get SO busy doing all these “shoulds” that we miss the opportunity to really soak in the good stuff and savor this joyful time with loved ones.

How can you re-capture the simpler joy of the holidays?  First of all, figure out the things that authentically make you happy in December. Make a list of all the things that you truly look forward to (or would look forward to if you had the time to focus on it!).  Then schedule enough time for these big rocks that you can slow down and really enjoy them.

So what about all that other stuff that fills up your holiday season?  How can you clear out time to really savor the parts you love?  Here are some ideas:

Ditch the “shoulds.”    Got a holiday tradition that brings you nothing but stress?  Don’t do it.  Are your neighbors really going to run you out of town if you don’t put up lights?  Do each of your officemates really need a rum cake? Let it go. Don’t get pulled into something you don’t enjoy just because you have always done it that way or other people expect you to.  These are YOUR holidays.  Own them.  (Sound scary?  Start small with 1-2 things to cut this year, and commit to what you’ll eliminate next year.)

Enlarge the part that makes you happy and minimize the rest.  Is gathering with friends and loved ones really important to you, but the meal planning and cooking stresses you out?  Change it up.  Co-host with someone who likes to cook but needs a house like yours to pull it off.  Make it a potluck.  Order take-out.  Meet at a restaurant or roller rink or somewhere else unexpected and fun.  Get creative with ways to get more of what you want and less of what you don’t.

Change the timeline.  Who says the things you love (or even feel obliged to do) around the holidays have to happen in December? My wife loves to send out a creative and snarky holiday card.  But she rarely gets it done by Christmas.  We routinely send out New Years or MLK Day, or even spring solstice cards.    Love to bake cookies?  Do it for Valentine’s Day instead.  Is finding that right gift fun when you have time for it?  Focus on birthdays and skip December.

Just Say No.  If an event doesn’t sound *more* fun than something on your favorites list, just say no.  An invitation is not an obligation. Our friends don’t want us to go to something we won’t enjoy. We throw a kooky New Year’s Eve party and, every year, some of our best friends say no.  Welcoming the new year with just their family makes them happy.  Or if your friends always invite people that push your buttons, give it a pass this year and enjoy a night savoring something that gives you joy.

Limiting your activities to those things that you really love can make all the difference in enjoying your holidays.  And it will give you time to slow down and really savor the best parts.  And don’t forget that happiness is infectious – as you reduce your holiday stress and increase your happiness, your friends and loved ones will become happier too.  And what better gift can you give during the holidays?

Tune in next week for tips on making gift-giving a joyful experience, not a dreaded, stress-filled chore.

Eric Karpinski
The Happiness Coach